Helping students grow their intelligence

01_NH03TES_1147390k

It wasn’t that long ago that psychologists believed girls couldn’t outperform boys—but, of course, life has certainly demonstrated that that isn’t the case, particularly in the academic realm.

In an article recently published on the Teachers Media International website, Professor Deborah Eyre, founder of High Performance Learning, explores the key factors that impact academic achievement—opportunity, support, and a clear motivation to succeed.

“It’s not just girls who can perform highly,” Eyre writes. “It’s all students, regardless of gender, background, or race.”

Eyre notes that new evidence demonstrates early childhood success is not a strong indicator of eventual adult success—students must know more than simply how to “pass the test.” Instead, a cognitively successful learner “is able to deploy a wide variety of thinking approaches—both critical and creative—but also, crucially, the values attitudes and attributes such as empathy, mental agility and hard work needed to secure high performance.”

In the article, Eyre also introduces the seven pillars of high performance, as further discussed in her book, High Performance Learning: How to Become a World Class School.

diagram_4_dea

To read the full article and view complementary professional learning videos from our extensive resource library, register for the Teachers Media International platform service—our Lite version is free!

~ The Teachers Media Team

Advertisements

Story Starter: Three Questions

the_three_questions

Popular literature often inspires creative writing prompts. For this week’s story starter, consider The Three Questions, written and illustrated by Jon. J. Muth.

In this beautiful picture book, based on a popular story by Leo Tolstoy, a young boy named Nikolai seeks counsel from his animal friends to find the answers to three important questions:

  • When is the best time to do things?
  • Who is the most important one?
  • What is the right thing to do?

The heron, the monkey, and the dog are quick to respond—but their answers do not satisfy Nikolai. He turns to the wise old turtle that lives in the mountains for help. But it is Nikolai’s response to a stranger’s call for help that leads him to the answers he seeks.

If you don’t have access to the book in your classroom, you can play this read aloud video for your students.

After reading—or listening to—this book, pose the three questions to students to promote reflective responses, or consider three alternative questions.

What other examples from literature can you use in the classroom to create story starters? Share your ideas in the comments below!

~ The Teachers Media Team

Understanding common traits key to creating world class schools, expert says

E3YTYW-graduates_2985431b

How do you create a world class school?

Internationally-renowned leading academic, Professor Deborah Eyre, says the first step begins with understanding the common characteristics of high-performance schools.

In an exclusive article written for Teachers Media International, Eyre outlines a route to academic success, noting that the best schools are committed to the following three deliverables:

  1. Everyone in the school, regardless of background or starting point, achieves the highest academic standards.
  2. Students equipped with the values, attitudes, and attributes that will serve them well in university, the workplace, and their life.
  3. The school delivering this outcome consistently year after year regardless of changes to context or circumstance.

diagram_world_class_schools

To access the full article and thousands of professional learning resources including best practice videos, learning packs, and interactives, register for Teachers Media International. Our “Lite” service is free!

Professor Eyre is the founder of High Performance Learning, which focuses on working with a school on a framework to help them achieve pupil performance goals.

~ The Teachers Media Team

TMI named one of 10 Hottest Social Media Solution Companies for 2016

angelaTeachers Media International (TMI) has been named by Education Technology Insights as one of the 10 Hottest Social Media Solution Companies for 2016.

Selected by a distinguished jury comprised of CEOs, CIOs, VCs, and analysts including the Education Technology Insights editorial board, the award acknowledges leading firms that offer “best-of-breed technology solutions and services related to social media in the education sector.”

“Our team works tirelessly to provide a combination of solution-based resources for the global education sector,” says Angela Ney, Founder, Teachers Media International, a global provider of online professional development services and programs. “We are honoured to be recognised for our work, along with nine other outstanding companies.”

11021601In an article featured in the January 2016 issue of Education Technology Insights, Ney outlines the Teachers Media International ethos and philosophy, noting that the company works with education ministries from around the world to provide a customised blend of solution-based resources, ranging from teacher ambassador mentorship programming to a comprehensive multi-media professional learning platform.

“We also understand that we, as a service, need to be accessible to all, so we are building a multi-language approach for our users from platform to mobile,” Ney explained.

To learn more about the award and the other nine companies who have received this distinction, you can find the full article here.

~ The Teachers Media Team

Story starter: Out of this world

istock_000061159882_small_2

Getting students excited about writing isn’t easy—and for most kids, the first obstacle is coming up with a story idea. Teachers Media International can help!

Every week, we’ll post a story starter that will hopefully inspire your students to get creative—whether writing individually, or as a class. While it would be impossible to find a global “curriculum” fit, we have tried to make each starter flexible, relevant, and fun.

Story Starter: Out of this world

The force isn’t the only thing that “awakened” with the release of the highly-anticipated Star Wars movie—the public appears to have a renewed interest in all things outer space. In fiction, both on the page and on the screen, setting is a primary characteristic of storytelling, perhaps even more so with tales that veer toward science fiction and fantasy.

After a brainstorming session about the solar system, complemented by library or internet research, have students write a descriptive paragraph about an out of this world place—alien nation on Jupiter? City among the stars? The sky, or rather the universe, is the limit! Don’t forget to use all the senses in creating this fictional world.

Have you used any of our story starters in your classroom? Let us know in the comments—and of course, if you want to share some of your students’ writing, we’d be thrilled!

~ The Teachers Media Team

Story starter: To do homework, or not to do homework

_82672277_86526994

Getting students excited about writing isn’t easy—and for most kids, the first obstacle is coming up with a story idea. Teachers Media International can help!

Every week, we’ll post a story starter that will hopefully inspire your students to get creative—whether writing individually, or as a class. While it would be impossible to find a global “curriculum” fit, we have tried to make each starter flexible, relevant, and fun.

Below, check out this week’s creative spark, which is suitable for secondary students. For K-6 story starters, scroll through our archives.

To do homework, or not to do homework—that is the question

Your school has considered adopting a “no homework” policy, but not everyone—students, teachers, parents, coaches, etc—is in favour. On one side of the debate, there are those that believe in its benefits. But research on the pros and cons of daily homework is inconclusive.

You have been chosen by your class to take the side of a a “No Homework Policy.” Write a letter to your principal that is well-researched, grounded in fact, and persuasive. 

Have you used any of our story starters in your classroom? Let us know in the comments—and of course, if you want to share some of your student writing, we’d be thrilled to see it!

~ The Teachers Media Team

TMI attending conference to support Syrian refugee-hosting communities

a628a6df-3d1f-409b-a99e-2246952a3ba3

Teachers Media International (TMI) is today attending the conference “Enabling the Private Sector to support Refugee-Hosting Communities” held by the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, at its London Headquarters.

At TMI we believe our unique advanced training methods can help enable the private sector to help cope with the Syrian refugee crisis in Turkey, Lebanon, and Jordan. Our ability to provide training flexibly, at scale, and in ways directly adapted to the needs of the recipients, gives us an opportunity to take part in meeting the greatest humanitarian challenge of our time.

When we speak of training, we mean not only teacher training, but all kinds of vocational training. One of the most important needs is to provide skills to both the refugees and to job-seekers in host countries. We believe this is achievable. But it needs leadership by and within the international agencies.

Today’s conference feeds into tomorrow’s ministerial Supporting Syria Conference, also in London, hosted by the UK, Kuwait, Norway, Germany, and the United Nations, which aims to mobilise major new funds for the challenge.

We shall be following up.

~ James Watt

James Watt is TMI’s Senior Director of Policy and Strategy. To learn more about our company or to register for our professional learning platform service, please visit the Teachers Media International website.

Top 5 trends in global education

J2513002
School education is subject to continual change and refinement, but while countries and cultures differ, the world has become more global and education has begun to develop some global concerns and interests. These are emerging as strong themes in all education systems and amongst all education policy makers no matter how developed the system is within country.

In a new article published on the Teachers Media International website, internationally-renowned leading academic, Professor Deborah Eyre explores the top five trends in global education. We’ve teased the highlights below.

Global trends in education

1. The recognition that high achievement at school is the foundation of lifetime success.
It remains true that those who do well at school tend to do well in their adult life.

2. High achievement must be for the many not the few.
The reason that 50% of students go to university in Canada and 10% in South Africa is not about ability. It is about opportunity.

3. We need life-ready students with the right skills and attitudes.
There is a great deal of evidence from across the world to show that a gap exists between what the economies demand from education and what the school system produces or indeed what students need to know to thrive in the 21st Century and what school teaches.

4. Students with a global outlook.
Global understanding and tolerance becomes increasingly important in a world of rapid communication and travel. So schooling is not just preparing students for life in their own country but also for life with those from other nationalities and cultures and with other beliefs.

5. Technology transforming where and when they learn.
Laptops, tablets, phones and interactive whiteboards are being used to support existing pedagogy. In some countries, e.g. Hong Kong, the mandatory text books are online so they can be updated regularly and at low cost.

For further explanation, study details, and accompanying videos from the Teachers Media International professional development resource library, you view the article in its entirely here.

Professor Eyre is the founder of High Performance Learning, which focuses on working with a school on a framework to help them achieve pupil performance goals.

~ The Teachers Media Team